Research team

SOLIDARITIES is a multi-sited ethnography in three countries. Our team comes from University College London (UK), Aarhus University (Denmark), and Linköping University (Sweden).

Mette Louise Berg

Principal investigator (PI)

Lead on case study 1 -- Dispersal and deservingness in northeast England

Coordinator of the Academic Advisory Board

Read Mette's bio

She is Professor of Migration and Diaspora Studies in the UCL Social Research Institute, founding co-editor of Migration and Society, an international, interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal, and co-director of UCL’s Migration Research Unit.

Mette is a social anthropologist with research interests in migration, diasporas and migrant transnationalism; urban diversity and conviviality; gender, belonging and generation. Recent publications include the co-edited volumes Studying Diversity, Migration and Urban Multiculture: Convivial Tools for Research and Practice (UCL Press, 2019); Ethnography, Diversity and Urban Space (Routledge 2015); and Re-Imagining Diasporas and Generations, a double special issue of Diaspora: a Journal of Transnational Studies (2015).

Mette has worked extensively with local authorities and social justice and migrants’ rights organisations, including Cambridge House, Migrants Rights’ Network, EU Mobile Citizens, and Latin American Women’s Rights’ Service.

Anders Neergaard

Co-investigator (CI)

Swedish team lead

Lead on Case study 2 -- In the waiting-room

Case study 5: Deserving children and undeserving parents in Sweden

Read Anders' bio

Anders is professor and director of the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University, Sweden. His current research, besides Solidarities, focus on the following projects: Trade unions and white maculinities; Trade unions and the extreme right; Ethnographies of anti-racism and conviviality; and, Cultures of Rejection.

Some of his recent publications include being co-editor and author for the volume Reimagineering the Nation (Peter Lang (2017)); co-author for the articles “Race” and the upsurge of antagonistic popular movements in Sweden (Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2017); Crisis of Solidarity? Changing Welfare and Migration Regimes in Sweden (Critical Sociology, 2019); Asylum-seekers and refugees within Europe and labour market integration (Transfer, 2019); and, Why are care workers from the global south disadvantaged? Inequality and discrimination in Swedish elderly care work (Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2020).

Theoretically, Anders’ research is inspired by neo-Marxism, Feminism, Ethnic and Migration studies and Critical Race Theory, often with an intersectional approach. Methodologically, Anders uses qualitative methods, often in mixed methods research projects.

Rachel Rosen

Co-investigator (CI)

Lead on case study 4 -- The politics of need: Inclusive and exclusive solidarities with families with NRPF

Ethics coordinator

Coordinator of the Stakeholder Knowledge Exchange Board (SKEB)

Read Rachel's bio

Rachel Rosen is an Associate Professor of Childhood in the Department of Social Science at University College London. Her work focuses on unequal childhoods, migration, and stratified social reproduction.

Rachel’s scholarship contributes to debates about the politics of children and childhood and changing adult-child relations in the context of neo-liberal migration and welfare regimes. She is co-author of Negotiating Adult-Child Relationships in Early Childhood Research (2014, Routledge), and co-editor of Reimagining Childhood Studies (2019, Bloomsbury Academic) and Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes? (2018, UCL Press). She is currently co-leading an ESRC-funded project: Children Caring on the Move.

Methodologically, her work focuses on the ethics and politics of participatory research with children and other marginalised social groups. In addition to her university-based scholarship, Rachel has worked with migrants’ rights organisations in Canada and the UK since the 1990s. Through Refuge in a Moving World (UCL), she coordinates participatory projects designed to open up spaces of knowledge production at UCL.

Mikkel Rytter

Co-investigator (CI)

Danish team lead

Lead on case study 6 -- Ageing migrants: Negotiating welfare benefits and care arrangements in Denmark

Read Mikkel's bio

Mikkel Rytter is Professor MSO at Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University and co-director of the interdiciplinary Centre for Migration and Integration research, Aarhus University MIAU. His research focuses on questions of migration, integration, family, marriage, generation, ageing, care, welfare, securitization, research methodology, Muslim minorities, Islam and Sufism.

Mikkel’s recent publications include the two monographs “Integration” (Aarhus University Press, 2019) and “Family Upheaval: Generation, Mobility and Relatedness among Pakistani migrants in Denmark” (Berghahn Books, 2013), the special issue on “Rituals of Migration” (Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 2018, vol. 44, no 16) and the edited volume “Anthropology Inside Out: Fieldworkers Taking Notes” (Sean Kingston Publisher, 2020). For full list of Mikkel Rytter’s publications see here.

Line Grüner

PhD student

Lead on case study 3 -- Refugees and deservingness: Negotiations of solidarity in a rural welfare micropublic in Denmark

Read Line's bio

Line Grüner is a PhD Student in the Department of Anthropology, School of Culture and Society at Aarhus University, Denmark. Her research interests are migration and belonging; time and continuity; social in- and exclusion.

With a background in museum anthropology, Line has worked with exhibition and audio-visual media as platforms for dialogue and knowledge production. In 2018 Line co-curated two associated ethnographic exhibitions at Samsoe Museum and Moesgaard Museum about home-making and everyday life after the escape in collaboration with Syrian families living in Denmark.

Methodologically, Line’s research focuses on exhibition, co-creation and ethics in participatory research with refugees.

Pouran 
Djampour

Postdoctoral researcher

Case study 2 -- In the waiting-room

Case study 5 -- Deserving children and undeserving parents

Read Pouran's bio

Pouran Djampour has a PhD in Social work and is doing her postdoc at the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University, Sweden. Her current research, in addition to SOLIDARITIES, focuses on action research as method, discomforts in doing research and the import of borderlands in social work.

Some of her most recent publications include her thesis Borders Crossing Bodies – The stories of eight youth with experience of migrating (Holmbergs, 2018); being co-writer of the anthology chapter Asylstafetten och No Border Musical (Daidalos, 2016) and Politisk organisering i en tid av ökad migrationskontroll (Tyfon, 2016).

Pouran’s previous research has mainly been about migration, borders and resistance. Theoretically she is inspired by Critical Border Studies (CBS), postcolonial and feminist theory. She is specialized in ethnographic methods, particularly in conversation and participatory methods

 

Eve Dickson

Research Assistant (RA)

Case study 1 -- Dispersal and deservingness in northeast England

Case study 4 -- The politics of need

Read Eve's bio

Eve has a PhD from Queen Mary University of London. She has worked with migrants for over five years as a practitioner, policy officer, activist and researcher. Her research interests are in migration and the nexus between welfare and migration regimes, gender, childhood, social reproduction, and intersubjectivity.

Eve’s recent publications include a co-authored research report ‘Local authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic’ (University of Wolverhampton, 2020) and a forthcoming co-authored book chapter entitled ‘Hunger or indebtedness? Enforcing migrant destitution, racializing debt’. In addition to her work on SOLIDARITIES, Eve is a research assistant on the British Academy/Leverhulme-funded research project Social reproduction in the shadows: migrant mothers and children with ‘no recourse to public funds’. Her methodological interests include ethnographic and participatory methods and textual analysis.

Eve’s previous research has focused on psychosocial questions of intersubjectivity, gender and embodiment in psychoanalysis and performance.

Mette Louise Berg

Mette is the principal investigator leading the SOLIDARITIES project; she is Professor of Migration and Diaspora Studies in the UCL Social Research Institute, founding co-editor of Migration and Society, an international, interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal, and co-director of UCL’s Migration Research Unit.

Mette is a social anthropologist with research interests in migration, diasporas and migrant transnationalism; urban diversity and conviviality; gender, belonging and generation. Recent publications include the co-edited volumes Studying Diversity, Migration and Urban Multiculture: Convivial Tools for Research and Practice (UCL Press, 2019); Ethnography, Diversity and Urban Space (Routledge 2015); and Re-Imagining Diasporas and Generations, a double special issue of Diaspora: a Journal of Transnational Studies (2015).

Mette has worked extensively with local authorities and social justice and migrants’ rights organisations, including Cambridge House, Migrants Rights’ Network, EU Mobile Citizens, and Latin American Women’s Rights’ Service.

Principal investigator (PI)

Lead on case study 1 -- Dispersal and deservingness in northeast England

Coordinator of the Academic Advisory Board

Anders Neergaard

Anders is professor and director of the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University, Sweden. His current research, besides Solidarities, focus on the following projects: Trade unions and white maculinities; Trade unions and the extreme right; Ethnographies of anti-racism and conviviality; and, Cultures of Rejection.

Some of his recent publications include being co-editor and author for the volume Reimagineering the Nation (Peter Lang (2017)); co-author for the articles “Race” and the upsurge of antagonistic popular movements in Sweden (Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2017); Crisis of Solidarity? Changing Welfare and Migration Regimes in Sweden (Critical Sociology, 2019); Asylum-seekers and refugees within Europe and labour market integration (Transfer, 2019); and, Why are care workers from the global south disadvantaged? Inequality and discrimination in Swedish elderly care work (Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2020).

Theoretically, Anders’ research is inspired by neo-Marxism, Feminism, Ethnic and Migration studies and Critical Race Theory, often with an intersectional approach. Methodologically, Anders uses qualitative methods, often in mixed methods research projects.

Co-investigator (CI)

Swedish team lead

Lead on Case study 2 -- In the waiting-room

Case study 5: Deserving children and undeserving parents in Sweden

Co-investigator (CI)

Swedish team lead

Lead on Case study 2 -- In the waiting-room

Case study 5 -- Deserving children and undeserving parents

Anders Neergaard

Anders is professor and director of the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University, Sweden. His current research, besides Solidarities, focus on the following projects: Trade unions and white maculinities; Trade unions and the extreme right; Ethnographies of anti-racism and conviviality; and, Cultures of Rejection.

 

Some of his recent publications include being co-editor and author for the volume Reimagineering the Nation (Peter Lang (2017)); co-author for the articles “Race” and the upsurge of antagonistic popular movements in Sweden (Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2017); Crisis of Solidarity? Changing Welfare and Migration Regimes in Sweden (Critical Sociology, 2019); Asylum-seekers and refugees within Europe and labour market integration (Transfer, 2019); and, Why are care workers from the global south disadvantaged? Inequality and discrimination in Swedish elderly care work (Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2020).

Theoretically, Anders’ research is inspired by neo-Marxism, Feminism, Ethnic and Migration studies and Critical Race Theory, often with an intersectional approach. Methodologically, Anders uses qualitative methods, often in mixed methods research projects.

Rachel Rosen

Rachel Rosen is an Associate Professor of Childhood in the Social Research Insitute at University College London. Her work focuses on unequal childhoods, migration, and stratified social reproduction and contributes to debates about the politics of children and childhood and changing adult-child relations in the context of neo-liberal migration and welfare regimes.

Rachel’s is co-author of Negotiating Adult-Child Relationships in Early Childhood Research (2014, Routledge), and co-editor of Reimagining Childhood Studies (2019, Bloomsbury Academic) and Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes? (2018, UCL Press). She is currently co-leading an ESRC-funded project: Children Caring on the Move.

Methodologically, her work focuses on the ethics and politics of participatory research with children and other marginalised social groups. In addition to her university-based scholarship, Rachel has worked with migrants’ rights organisations in Canada and the UK since the 1990s. Through Refuge in a Moving World (UCL), she coordinates participatory projects designed to open up spaces of knowledge production at UCL.

Co-investigator (CI)

Lead on case study 4 -- The politics of need

Ethics coordinator

Coordinator of the Stakeholder Knowledge Exchange Board (SKEB)

Mikkel Rytter

Mikkel Rytter is Professor MSO at Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University and co-director of the interdiciplinary Centre for Migration and Integration research, Aarhus University, MIAU. His research focuses on questions of migration, integration, family, marriage, generation, ageing, care, welfare, securitization, research methodology, Muslim minorities, Islam and Sufism. 

 

Mikkel’s recent publications include the two monographs “Integration” (Aarhus University Press, 2019) and “Family Upheaval: Generation, Mobility and Relatedness among Pakistani migrants in Denmark” (Berghahn Books, 2013), the special issue on “Rituals of Migration” (Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 2018, vol. 44, no 16) and the edited volume “Anthropology Inside Out: Fieldworkers Taking Notes” (Sean Kingston Publisher, 2020). See here for a full list of Mikkel Rytter’s publications.

Co-investigator (CI)

Danish team lead

Lead on case study 6 -- Ageing migrants: Negotiating welfare benefits and care arrangements in Denmark

Co-investigator (CI)

Danish team lead

Lead on case study 6 -- Ageing migrants: Negotiating welfare benefits and care arrangements in Denmark

Mikkel Rytter

Mikkel Rytter is Professor MSO at Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University and co-director of the interdisciplinary Centre for Migration and Integration research, Aarhus University, MIAU. His research focuses on questions of migration, integration, family, marriage, generation, ageing, care, welfare, securitization, research methodology, Muslim minorities, Islam and Sufism.

Mikkel’s recent publications include the two monographs “Integration” (Aarhus University Press, 2019) and “Family Upheaval: Generation, Mobility and Relatedness among Pakistani migrants in Denmark” (Berghahn Books, 2013), the special issue on “Rituals of Migration” (Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 2018, vol. 44, no 16) and the edited volume “Anthropology Inside Out: Fieldworkers Taking Notes” (Sean Kingston Publisher, 2020).

For full list of Mikkel Rytter’s publications see here.

Line Grüner

Line Grüner is a PhD Student in the Department of Anthropology, School of Culture and Society at Aarhus University, Denmark. Her research interests are migration and belonging; time and continuity; social in- and exclusion.

With a background in museum anthropology, Line has worked with exhibition and audio-visual media as platforms for dialogue and knowledge production. In 2018 Line co-curated two associated ethnographic exhibitions at Samsoe Museum and Moesgaard Museum about home-making and everyday life after the escape in collaboration with Syrian families living in Denmark.

Methodologically, Line’s research focuses on exhibition, co-creation and ethics in participatory research with refugees.

PhD student

Lead on case study 3 -- Refugees and deservingness: Negotiations of solidarity in a rural welfare micropublic in Denmark

Pouran Djampour

Pouran Djampour has a PhD in Social work and is doing her postdoc at the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University, Sweden. Her current research, in addition to SOLIDARITIES, focuses on action research as method, discomforts in doing research and the import of borderlands in social work.

 

Some of her most recent publications include her thesis Borders Crossing Bodies – The stories of eight youth with experience of migrating (Holmbergs, 2018); being co-writer of the anthology chapter Asylstafetten och No Border Musical (Daidalos, 2016) and Politisk organisering i en tid av ökad migrationskontroll (Tyfon, 2016).

Pouran’s previous research has mainly been about migration, borders and resistance. Theoretically she is inspired by Critical Border Studies (CBS), postcolonial and feminist theory. She is specialized in ethnographic methods, particularly in conversation and participatory methods

Postdoctoral researcher

Case study 2 -- In the waiting-room

Case study 5 -- Deserving children and undeserving parents

Postdoctoral researcher

Case study 2 -- In the waiting-room

Case study 5 -- Deserving children and undeserving parents

Pouran Djampour

Pouran Djampour has a PhD in Social work and is doing her postdoc at the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society (REMESO), Linköping University, Sweden. Her current research, in addition to SOLIDARITIES, focuses on action research as method, discomforts in doing research and the import of borderlands in social work.

 

Some of her most recent publications include her thesis Borders Crossing Bodies – The stories of eight youth with experience of migrating (Holmbergs, 2018); being co-writer of the anthology chapter Asylstafetten och No Border Musical (Daidalos, 2016) and Politisk organisering i en tid av ökad migrationskontroll (Tyfon, 2016).

Pouran’s previous research has mainly been about migration, borders and resistance. Theoretically she is inspired by Critical Border Studies (CBS), postcolonial and feminist theory. She is specialized in ethnographic methods, particularly in conversation and participatory methods

Eve Dickson

Eve has a PhD from Queen Mary University of London. She has worked with migrants for over five years as a practitioner, policy officer, activist and researcher. Her research interests are in migration and the nexus between welfare and migration regimes, gender, childhood, social reproduction, and intersubjectivity.

Eve’s recent publications include a co-authored research report ‘Local authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic(University of Wolverhampton, 2020) and a forthcoming co-authored book chapter entitled ‘Hunger or indebtedness? Enforcing migrant destitution, racializing debt’. In addition to her work on SOLIDARITIES, Eve is a research assistant on the British Academy/Leverhulme-funded research project Social reproduction in the shadows: migrant mothers and children with ‘no recourse to public funds’. Her methodological interests include ethnographic and participatory methods and textual analysis.

Eve’s previous research has focused on psychosocial questions of intersubjectivity, gender and embodiment in psychoanalysis and performance.

Research Assistant (RA)

Case study 1 -- Dispersal and deservingness in northeast England

Case study 4 -- The politics of need

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